Jazz Workshop – Tadasei http://tadasei.com/ Wed, 25 May 2022 13:54:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://tadasei.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/tadasei-icon-150x150.png Jazz Workshop – Tadasei http://tadasei.com/ 32 32 Three concerts on the bill at Blackmon https://tadasei.com/three-concerts-on-the-bill-at-blackmon/ Wed, 25 May 2022 13:54:00 +0000 https://tadasei.com/three-concerts-on-the-bill-at-blackmon/

The annual Tommy Jarrell Celebration – to commemorate the life and music of the influential local musician, is scheduled for February 24-24. 26 at the Historic Earle Theater in Mount Airy.

The celebration includes concerts, a competition for young people, workshops and a film screening. The popular festival has something for all lovers of early music. The annual event celebrates the music and teachings of Surry County musical pioneer and icon Tommy Jarrell, who lived from March 1, 1901 to January 28, 1985.

Many activities are planned at the Old-Time Music Heritage Hall in the Historic Earle Theater at 142 North Main Street.

On Thursday February 24, there are free courses for young people. The flatfoot dance is at 4:30 p.m., violin lessons are at 5:30 p.m., followed by guitar, banjo and mandolin lessons at 6:15 p.m. Music lessons are taught by Jim Vipperman, recipient of the Brown-Hudson Folklore Award as a traditional musician and teacher. These lessons are sponsored in part by a TAPS grant from the Folklife Division of the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

The Southeast Sirens Tour will take to the stage at 7:30 p.m. Thursday. The tour is presented by the Surry Arts Council and Pine State Marketing and features Caitlin Krisko & The Broadcast and Abby Bryant & The Echoes. Tickets are $15.

Friday at 7 p.m., free screening of “You Gave Me A Song”, a film about Alice Gerrard. The film offers an intimate portrait of early music pioneer Alice Gerrard and her remarkable and unpredictable journey in the creation and preservation of traditional music. A Q&A with director Kenny Dalsheimer and Gerrard will follow the film.

A short performance by Gerrard accompanied by Tatiana Hargreaves and Reed Stutz will follow the Q&A. This film and event are made possible in part by the vital support of Presenting Sponsor, the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources through their “She Changed the World: NC Women Breaking Barriers” and “ Come Hear NC”.

In a career spanning over 50 years, Gerrard has left an indelible mark on the history of traditional music. Her groundbreaking collaboration with Appalachian singer Hazel Dickens in the 1960s and 1970s produced four classic albums (recently reissued by Rounder) and influenced many young female singers. His next four solo albums, including Bittersweet, produced by Laurie Lewis, and Follow the Music, produced by Mike Taylor of His Golden Messenger, showcased Gerrard’s many talents: his captivating and eclectic songwriting; his powerful, cutting voice and instrumental mastery of rhythm guitar, banjo and old-school fiddle. Gerrard’s 2015 album Follow the Music was nominated for a Grammy. His latest release, Sing Me Back Home: The DC Tapes 1965-1969 on Free Dirt Records, won critical acclaim for its intimate insight into unreleased Hazel and Alice practice tapes.

Gerrard has appeared on over 20 recordings, including projects with many mainstream musicians such as Tommy Jarrell, Enoch Rutherford, Otis Burris, Luther Davis and Matokie Slaughter; with Tom Sauber and Brad Leftwich as Tom, Brad & Alice, with the Harmony Sisters, the Herald Angels, Beverly Smith, and with Anna Roberts-Gevalt and Elizabeth LaPrelle.

Old-Time workshops take place on Saturdays from 1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the Earle. Workshops are $25 per person and participants can register online www.surryarts.org or rj@surryarts.org or call 336-786-7998. Through classes, presentations, workshops and performances, attendees will learn from some of the most esteemed and respected musicians in the field: Chester McMillian, Martha Spencer and Emily Spencer.

The workshops will take place in the Historic Earle Theater and will include fiddle, banjo, guitar, bass, singing and dancing – whatever participants want to learn. Martha Spencer is a singer-songwriter, mountain musician and dancer from the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia. She grew up in the Spencer musical family and learned to play multiple instruments (guitar, fiddle, banjo, bass, dulcimer, mandolin) and flatfoot/hooffoot at a young age. She has performed shows, festivals and led workshops across the US, Australia, UK and Europe. She just released a solo album and has been featured in articles such as Rolling Stone Country, No Depression, Wide Open Country, Cowboys & Indians Magazine, Americana Highways and PopMatters.

Emily Spencer is a certified PK-12 teacher and has taught fiddle, banjo, guitar, mandolin, dulcimer, and bass in schools and at Wilkes Community College and Wytheville Community College. Since childhood she has played music and started playing with the Whitetop Mountain Band in the 1970s with Thornton Spencer and continues with the band today.

Chester McMillian was born in Carroll County, Virginia to a musical family and community. He has been playing traditional Old-time Round Peak style music since he was a child. By the age of 11 or 12 he was living in Surry County and actively involved in the Round Peak music community. In 1962 Chester married into the Dix Freeman family and the two began playing a lot of music together. Chester played guitar with Tommy Jarrell for fifteen years, and he developed his guitar style specifically for playing with Tommy. He has also performed and recorded with Dix Freeman, Kirk Sutphin and Greg Hooven, with whom he founded the band Backstep.

On Saturday, the WPAQ Merry-Go-Round begins at 11 a.m. with workshop instructors and participants followed by bands including Grace ‘N Grass.

Lew Bode and Jim Vipperman will preside over the Tommy Jarrell Festival Youth Competition Saturday at 3 p.m. at the Andy Griffith Museum Theater under the Andy Griffith Museum. Categories include fiddle, clawhammer banjo, guitar, vocals, dance, and others (which includes all other instruments and bands), in two age levels: 5-12 and 13-18. Competitors will have three minutes to perform and may have an attendant, although no recorded saves are allowed. Competitors can register for the event, there is no entry fee and trophies are awarded after the competition.

The Whitetop Mountain Band will take the stage Saturday at 7 p.m. for the Tommy Jarrell Birthday Concert and Dance, hosted by Lew Bode. The Whitetop Mountain Band is a family band from the highest mountains in Virginia. Known for their high energy and charisma on stage, Whitetop Mountain Band is one of Appalachia’s most popular dance groups. They have performed at all manner of venues across the United States and abroad, including the Smithsonian Folklife Festival, National Folklife Festival, World Music Institute, Carter Family Festival, Dock Boggs Festival, Exposition universal, the Virginia Arts Festival, the Floyd Fest, the Ola Belle Reed Festival. , and Merlefest. Tickets are $10.

For more information or to purchase tickets, visit www.surryarts.org or call the Surry Arts Council at 336-786-7998. Tickets can also be purchased at the door before each show if available. Select Tommy Jarrell Festival events are supported in part by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

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Ronnie Scott’s Lost Album (Review) https://tadasei.com/ronnie-scotts-lost-album-review/ Mon, 23 May 2022 14:01:35 +0000 https://tadasei.com/ronnie-scotts-lost-album-review/

There is a long-standing tension in improvised music between the primacy of live performance and the permanence of recordings. When the music is so different every performance because there’s so much improvisation, the most valuable “experience” would seem to be hearing it. inhabit, in the moment. Yet because sheet music cannot capture a jazz performance, recordings are the only valid permanent representation of music. This results in some recordings becoming canonical, the official frozen-in-time version of a piece of music, even if the musicians themselves don’t go on to interpret it in the same way – just think of how Miles Davis’ “So What” kind of blue runs through our brains at a choppy mid-tempo even though the band almost always played it much faster and without the studio intro we know so well.

The groups of Charles Mingus have do not were locked into this dialectic just as much as certain artists. Mingus often re-recorded his favorite compositions (for example, there is not a single definitive “Goodbye Porkpie Hat” or “Fables of Faubus”), and some of his best recordings come from concerts, which emphasize the tunes as vehicles for interpretation that changes over time. And, with Mingus, the changing staff of his “Jazz Workshop” tended to give us a kaleidoscope of ways to hear his best tunes.

Nevertheless, Ronnie Scott’s Lost Album is distinguished by the pleasure of re-hearing the music of Mingus. It is an excellent tool to underline the scope that the Mingus approach could have. Recorded live at the famous London club in August 1972, it captures the iconic bassist, composer and bandleader both at the peak of his powers and in a moment of transition. It’s not a weak Mingus recording, exactly, but the band is partly forgettable and wouldn’t stay together for very long. But Mingus, his compositions and his conception fly away.

With his (apparently largely fictionalized) autobiography just published and a Guggenheim Fellowship bringing him to a well-deserved level of respect and recognition, Mingus was peaking as an artist at the age of 50. However, his group was changing. The brilliant group of the 1960s with Eric Dolphy, Booker Ervin and Jaki Byard was behind him, and the quintet with Don Pullen and George Adams had yet to be formed. He hadn’t recorded much in the late 1960s, and when Columbia Records signed him in the early 70s, it brought together Let my children hear music, a great recording but with a jazz orchestra produced by Teo Macero, not the workshop group. The result is that most of us don’t know the band that joined Ronnie Scott that summer: alto saxophonist Charles McPherson and tenor saxophonist Bobby Jones, the very young Jon Faddis on trumpet, pianist John Foster and drummer Roy Brooks. McPherson is by far the most august and experienced player, and Jones and Foster would probably consider the Mingus gig the highlight of their careers.

So what does a Mingus band like this look like? How is the group positioned? Is the music of the master still transcendent in the hands of this group? A Mingus band without Dannie Richmond? Really? The evidence needed to answer these questions, recorded by Columbia Records just a year before removing all jazz musicians from its roster other than Miles Davis, is being heard 50 years later for the first time.

The band sounds very much like a Mingus band, even a classic Mingus band. Brooks seems uniquely creative and connected to Mingus, at the height of his own considerable powers after years of drumming with the world’s best jazz musicians and gaining both fluency and creativity. It’s delightfully sloppy and loose in some places, only to close out the band at perfect pace in others. On “Orange Was the Color of Her Dress, Then Silk Blues,” he works perfectly with Mingus to move the band through tempos and sentiment, snapping for eight bars, then super smooth a moment later.

The other standout, of course, is McPherson, who plays with the combination of modern jazz intelligence and deeply felt blues authenticity that a Mingus band tends to draw from players. His solo, for example, on “Noddin’ Ya Head Blues”, is played with the utmost relaxation, the lines leaning back over easy phrasing that invokes Charlie Parker but also seems to date from a time before bebop came into its own. make every player a pee. a bit frantic. He plays with more range and expansiveness on the 35-minute version of “Fables of Faubus” from this set, but is also aware of the band’s past and as a result never seems to allude to the famous sax solos. Eric Dolphy’s vocalized alto on the tune. . Rather, he stays cool for long stretches, allowing his bandmates to chat with him, even if it’s his solo – then when the band pushes him forward, rhythmically, he becomes a quick exponent of a more modern sensibility.

The rest of the sidemen here are fascinating but not exceptional, individually or collectively. Faddis is only 19, fresh out of his Dizzy Gillespie apprenticeship, and he seems most at home slamming into the upper register or laying out notes expressively, but all the connective tissue of a solo well-designed is not there yet. On “Faubus”, he is entertaining but in the manner of a comedian telling lines rather than someone telling a story. (Faddis’s comparison here to 19-year-old Wynton Marsalis with Art Blakey reveals just how completed Marsalis was so young.)

Likewise, John Foster’s pianism sounds brash and exciting but disparate. Unlike McPherson, Foster seems to be playing completely in the shadow of his famous predecessor, Jaki Byard. He uses Byard’s pseudo-stride playing whenever he can, employing crackling dissonance one moment, then pre-bop two-handed pianism the next. Listen to his “Faubus” solo (it’s the performance during the set that really exposes everyone’s best and worst side), and any number of 45-second tracks will stop you, but if you’re anything like me, you don’t know how the solo set makes no sense.

Tenor saxophonist Bobby Jones is perhaps the hardest player to crack. Jones plays his solo “Faubus” more like a pro, listening intently to the leader’s cues, tossing ideas back and forth, capable of a seemingly endless chain of interesting licks. Some of the licks seem otherworldly – meaning he sometimes converses with Mingus on “Faubus” as if he’s channeling Boots Randolph rather than Booker Ervin or Lester Young. It’s weird, but he integrates them into a fluid improvisation that has its own logic. He’s skillfully excellent, yes, but he looks like he’s visiting Mingus from a distant land, and, well, the master is kind and brilliant enough to welcome him. He didn’t last long with Mingus in the “jazz” world. Too bad in some ways, but when we hear him on the crazy and wildly open track “Mind Reader’s Convention in Milano (Aka No. 29)” we feel that his excellent saxophony is not so much at the service of feelings as at the service of production of notes.

Mingus himself is a wonder at every turn. He takes long unaccompanied solos (perhaps because he knew the full band wasn’t quite there?), and they’re masterful: free and full of form at the same time. His famous humor is in the spotlight as he pushes and pulls the rhythm section with known licks and propulsive rhythm, and he also sticks the proceedings in earnest. “Mind Reader’s Convention” uses various composing cells like railroad cars along a half-hour procession, and the Mingus/Brooks tandem keeps it gasping. Perhaps if this group had stayed together, Mingus would have been the one to get them all into shape, performing their individual vocals in concert.

Some of the other directories in this set are curious. “Noddin’ Ya Head” is a vocal feature for Foster – a vocal novelty being a not unheard of gamble in the Mingus quiver, but otherwise more of a lark than a joy. “Pops” is simply a Mingus-style version of “When the Saints Go Marchin’ In,” again with Foster on vocals, doing his best Armstrong impersonation. I mean it’s a blast and all, with Jones playing the clarinet and Faddis indulging in some New Orleans style, but only McPherson and Mingus seem to understand that this gender-playing exercise is designed to be as serious as lark. The release also contains some brief intro-outro tracks (“Ko-Ko” and “Airmail Special”) which are not good performances. Ultimately, the set is evenly split between long versions of Mingus classics and material of limited interest.

That doesn’t mean that Ronnie Scott’s Lost Album has no pleasures and no value. It’s Mingus’ centenary year, so we can spend some time on less essential material. But in a brilliant work like that of Charles Mingus, it’s more nerve than muscle or bone.

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Withdraw? East Bay pianist Professor Bob Athayde has other ideas https://tadasei.com/withdraw-east-bay-pianist-professor-bob-athayde-has-other-ideas/ Sat, 21 May 2022 15:00:10 +0000 https://tadasei.com/withdraw-east-bay-pianist-professor-bob-athayde-has-other-ideas/

Bob Athayde did not receive the retirement memo.

After 45 years in the classroom, including a perpetual run as orchestra director of Stanley Middle School since 1986, he’s well overdue for some rest and relaxation. There’s fish to catch, books to read, and a comfy chair to escape gravity.

But the only session Athayde seems to have scheduled involves a piano bench (you can catch him playing solo at La Finestra Piano Lounge in Moraga and holding the Thursday jam session at Bonehead’s Texas BBQ in Lafayette).

“When I wake up in the morning, I train for a few hours and normally would go to school,” Athayde said of his impending schedule change. “It has been my life’s work. I hope that the energy enters me instead of leaving it. I really want to play more.

His final weeks at Stanley were marked by several celebrations. It continues on May 22, when friends and family hosted an afternoon at St. Perpetua Church in Lafayette. Hosted by the Lafayette Summer Music Jazz Workshop, the innovative program Athayde founded in 1998, Farewell features a jazz combo led by his son, multi-instrumentalist Kyle Athayde.

“My sister Ellie will be there too,” said Kyle, 34, referring to bassist Eliana Athayde, the youngest of Athayde’s four musical siblings. “She leaves the road just in time.”

A gifted improviser and composer who leads the talented big band Kyle Athayde Dance Party, he attended Stanley Middle School’s music program and got to see his dad at work up close. For many middle schoolers, the thought of attending the same campus as a faculty relative, let alone sharing a classroom, would elicit an epic reaction.

Rather than causing angst, Athayde said the experience “was amazing. I loved having him as a teacher. All the ways he provided opportunities and inspired other students, it was all there for me too.

The musical opportunities available at Stanley Middle School are a result of Athyade’s support throughout the community, including
the Stanley PTA, the Lafayette Partners in Education, the Generations in Jazz Foundation, and the Julia Burke Foundation, which also paved the way for one of his major post-Stanley initiatives.

Rather than relax, he is about to mark his post-retirement career by launching a new educational initiative. With support from the Julia Burke Foundation, he will consult with schools that can use his knowledge of curriculum development.

In a meeting with the Julia Burke Foundation, “They asked, ‘What are you going to do after Stanley?’ and I said ‘Help schools and teachers in need’. ‘Who is funding this?’ ‘Nobody.’ “We’ll fund it. Ever since the pandemic happened, all the music programs are in need. I can go anywhere in the United States and work with them.

Athayde has a knack for attracting people who have something to give and a keen eye for identifying stellar musicians who are also effective educators. When he launched the Lafayette Summer Music Jazz Workshop, his first decision was to recruit veteran saxophonist Mary Fettig, a universally esteemed player who gave the program instant gravitas and made it easier to attract other talented teachers.

“If she calls someone, they’ll join,” Athayde said. “She was the first curriculum director. At the beginning, we had some good players who weren’t committed teachers. But little by little, we kept bringing back people who could teach.

Success begat success. Students who have completed the program and become professional musicians return summer after summer to teach and coach Stanley students during the school year. Moraga-raised trombonist/composer Alan Ferber, 47, credits Athayde with changing the course of his life by putting him in touch with trombone teacher Dean Hubbard.

A Grammy-nominated bandleader based in New York, Ferber has taught at the Lafayette workshop since the mid-2000s, observing how “Bob is really an advocate for people who grew up in his orbit to come back to teach. I have also done a few workshops in his Stanley class and he will be blasting music for his students before they start which will keep them motivated.

Athayde feels he is leaving Stanley’s music program in good hands and he will continue at the Lafayette workshop. His retirement without retirement feels like a whole new musical adventure.

Contact Andrew Gilbert at jazzscribe@aol.com.


SIR. ATHAYDE RETIREMENT PARTY

When: 2-6 p.m. May 22

Or: St. Perpetua Church, 3454 Hamlin Road, Lafayette

More information: RSVP to Ginni Reynolds ginreyn@comcast.net, www.facebook.com/events/2800669926901353/

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Getty Center Partners with LA Phil’s Youth Orchestra Los Angeles (YOLA) for Getty’s 25th Anniversary – Los Angeles Sentinel | Los Angeles Sentinel https://tadasei.com/getty-center-partners-with-la-phils-youth-orchestra-los-angeles-yola-for-gettys-25th-anniversary-los-angeles-sentinel-los-angeles-sentinel/ Thu, 19 May 2022 16:01:04 +0000 https://tadasei.com/getty-center-partners-with-la-phils-youth-orchestra-los-angeles-yola-for-gettys-25th-anniversary-los-angeles-sentinel-los-angeles-sentinel/

The Getty Center partners with LA Phil’s Youth Orchestra Los Angeles (YOLA) for Getty’s 25th Anniversary

Lisa Lapin, Vice President of Communications, J. Paul Getty Trust, Renae Williams Niles, Head of Content and Engagement, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Eloy Morales Jr., Member of the Inglewood City Council, Camille Delaney-McNeil, Director, Beckmen YOLA Center, James Thomas Butts Jr., Mayor of Inglewood, Chad Smith, CEO of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Mary-Elizabeth, Head of Community and Government Affairs, J. Paul Getty Trust, Alex Padilla, Member of the City Council of Inglewood, Elsje Kibler-Vermaas, Vice President for Learning, Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Getty 25 in Inglewood this weekend. (Aurelia D’Amore Photography)

For their 25and anniversary, the Getty Center has partnered with organizations in Los Angeles to host free community art weekends. Attendees can enjoy hands-on art workshops, live music and performances, giveaways, a photo booth, an immersive digital experience provided by the Getty Collections, food, and more.

Getty has partnered with the LA Phil’s Youth Orchestra Los Angeles (YOLA) to showcase the city’s arts and culture. Opening weekend was Saturday, May 14 and Sunday, May 15, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., for a two-day festival at Inglewood City Hall.

The Inglewood City Hall Lawn, Grevillea Art Park and Beckman YOLA Center hosted interactive workshops and featured live performances with local musicians, artisans and visual artists. The events gave local artists and musicians a platform to showcase their talents and vendors an opportunity to promote their business.

Saturday’s event included performances by YOLA, Walkgood Presents: Makélé Sound Bath & Kemetic Yoga with Anu Wolley, Black Nile, Voices of Creation, Foreigner B2B Blaq Pages, We Are King, ICYOLA Jazz Band and DJ Qwesscoast & Friends. DJ Gudo, students of the Inglewood Unified School District, No)one. Art House Movement Workshop with Chris Emile has also performed on the Inglewood youth scene, and more.

The Inglewood High School Marching Band is performing this weekend for Getty’s 25th birthday in Inglewood. (Aurelia D’Amore Photography).

Sunday performances included sounds from DJ Jeli and DJ Gudo, SHINE Muwasi, YOLA and ICYOLA, The Albert McNeil Jubilee Singers, Brasil Brasil Cultural Center, Godfrey at Large, Katalyst, MUNEKA, 1500 Sound Academy, Capoeira Workshop with Brasil Brasil and DJ Battlecat and G-Funk All-Stars with Georgia Anne Muldrow

Attendees had a variety of exhibits to explore and art activities and activations to choose from, including a Community Gathering Workshop by Colored Art Studio, a Community Art Exhibit curated by Kayla Salisbury, Writing Your Inner Geography by Fei Hernandez, Inglewood Open Studios (IOS) Coloring Workshop with local artists, sculpture workshop by The Creative House, ink fun workshop by Martin Durazo, Gathering Clouds art activation at Beckmen YOLA Center by Helen Lessick and environmental art demonstrations with Dobby Garden.

Food vendors included Mr. Fries Man, Billionaire Burger Boyz, Compton Vegan, I Love Funnel Cakes and Crenshaw Coffee Co.

YOLA performs to celebrate the Getty Center’s 25th anniversary. (Aurelia D’Amore Photography).

Serving more than 1,500 young musicians across five locations, YOLA provides them with free instruments, up to 18 hours a week of intensive music instruction, academic support and leadership training.

For more information on Getty 25 festivals, visit: https://www.getty.edu/news/getty-announces-locations-for-10-free-community-art-festivals-across-los-angeles/

For more information on LA Phil and this weekend’s event, visit: www.laphil.com and https://www.laphil.com/campaigns/celebrate-inglewood-community-festival.

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POAC presents the iconic Brubeck Brothers Quartet https://tadasei.com/poac-presents-the-iconic-brubeck-brothers-quartet/ Tue, 17 May 2022 08:01:05 +0000 https://tadasei.com/poac-presents-the-iconic-brubeck-brothers-quartet/


The Pend Oreille Arts Council welcomes the Brubeck Brothers, an exciting jazz quartet featuring the gifted sons of legendary jazz musician Dave Brubeck, to the community this week.

The quartet will perform on stage at the Panida Theater at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 19.

“We are thrilled to wrap up our 2021-22 performing arts season with these incredible and iconic artists,” said POAC Executive Director Tone Lund. “Music fans of all ages at Sandpoint are in for a treat!

Dan Brubeck (drums) and Chris Brubeck (bass and trombone) carry the name of one of America’s most accomplished musical families, joined by guitarist Mike DeMicco and pianist Chuck Lamb to form this dynamic quartet.

Brothers Chris and Dan have been making music together virtually their entire lives, recording their first record together in 1966, nearly half a century ago. They went on to play a variety of styles in a number of different bands, as well as with their father, cool jazz giant Dave Brubeck, and with their own Brubeck Brothers Quartet, the BBQ!

They perform at concert series, colleges, and jazz festivals across North America and Europe, including Newport, Detroit, Montreal, Playboy/Hollywood Bowl, and Monterey Jazz Festivals. The quartet’s latest CD, “LifeTimes”, was a hit on the Jazz Week radio charts where it made the Top 10 as one of the most played jazz recordings of the year.

The Sandpoint High School Jazz Band, under the direction of Aaron Gordon, is delighted to welcome the Brubeck brothers to the high school for a special workshop the morning of the show. SHS Band members will also receive tickets to the evening show at Panida as part of POAC’s Ovations educational program.

Although the quartet’s style is rooted in “straight-ahead jazz”, their concerts reveal an inherent ability to explore and play with uncanny time signatures while naturally incorporating influences from funk, blues and world music. The band’s creativity, technique and improvisation can be heard in their uncompromising music, which reflects their dedication to the melody, rhythm, culture and spontaneous spirit of jazz.

Advance tickets are recommended for this show. All “BBQ” tickets are $27, available at the POAC office, online at artinsandpoint.org, or by phone at 208-263-6139. Doors open at the Panida Theater at 7:00 p.m. and the show starts at 7:30 p.m.

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Band, Choral Concerts from Pentucket’s Award-Winning Music Education Program | News https://tadasei.com/band-choral-concerts-from-pentuckets-award-winning-music-education-program-news/ Sun, 15 May 2022 19:45:00 +0000 https://tadasei.com/band-choral-concerts-from-pentuckets-award-winning-music-education-program-news/

WEST NEWBURY — The Pentucket School District’s award-winning instrumental group and choir continue to host concerts for the public throughout May and June.

Pentucket is also a National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) “Best Communities for Music Education” school district for the second year in a row. School Superintendent Justin Bartholomew and Music Director David Schumacher made the announcement this spring.

“Being recognized two years in a row is a testament to the strength of our music education and the dedication of our faculty. Our students thrive as a result,” Bartholomew said in a statement.

To be considered for the award, “the district answered questions about funding, graduation requirements, music class attendance, instruction time, facilities, music program support and community-based music-making programs. These responses have been verified with school officials and reviewed by the Music Research Institute at the University of Kansas,” the statement said.

Due to the strength of its music programs, beginning in grade 4, many PRHS graduates have gone on to study at prestigious post-secondary programs, including Berklee College of Music. Pentucket students regularly qualify for district, state, and national music awards.

“Music and the arts are also about emotional well-being, so our music program has supported our community for the past two years,” Schumacher said. “Applying for this designation has been a colossal undertaking involving the coordination of the K-12 music faculty, our district directors, and our community, so we sincerely thank everyone involved in the process.”

To learn more about the NAMM foundation and its more than 10,300 members worldwide, visit nammfoundation.org.

The concert program is as follows:

Tuesday, May 17, 7 p.m.. Pentucket Regional High School (PRHS) Gymnasium, 24 Main St., West Newbury. District Orchestra Jamboree with grades 4-6, Pentucket Regional Middle School Concert Orchestra (PRMS), PRHS Concert Orchestra, and PRHS Big Band. The show’s grand finale is for all of the students in grades 4 through 12 to perform “Sweet Caroline” together.

Wednesday, May 18, 7 p.m. PRHS Auditorium, 24 Main St., West Newbury. District Choral Jamboree with elementary, PRMS and PRHS choirs.

Wednesday, May 25, 7:00 p.m. PRHS auditorium, 24 Main St., West Newbury. PRMS and PRHS groups and percussion concert, with PRMS Concert Band, PRMS Jazz Band, PRMS Percussion Ensemble, PRHS Concert Band and PRHS Percussion Ensemble. The PRMS Jazz Band will premiere a piece commissioned for the Pentucket Music Program by Pentucket alumnus Bobby Spellman. Spellman will perform with the school bands as a special guest. This commission was funded by the Trailblazer Award I received from the Pentucket Education Foundation.

Note that this will be the last musical performance in the original PRHS building before its demolition. The construction of a new PRMS/PRHS is in progress.

Related events

Friday, June 3, the PRMS Choir, Orchestra and Band will travel to Western Massachusetts to participate in the Great East/Six Flags Music Festival in Springfield. This is a judged performance followed by an afternoon at the Six Flags amusement park to celebrate the year of the Pentucket District Music Program.

Tuesday, June 7, Strings and Band Grades 5-6 students will embark on a “tour” of PRSD Elementary Schools. They will perform at each school, go out for lunch and hold recess at Action Cove Playground. This is part of the school district‘s recruitment effort to expose elementary students to the district’s music curriculum, teach them instruments, and perform for them.

Additionally, the Pentucket Music Boosters are accepting donations to help fund the Pentucket District’s 2023 trip to Disney World. This trip will send the PRHS band, orchestra, choir, percussion and jazz students to the Disney Festival for a series of performances and workshops.

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LMMO presents Central Washington Mini-Tour with Pierre Bensusan, the French guitar master https://tadasei.com/lmmo-presents-central-washington-mini-tour-with-pierre-bensusan-the-french-guitar-master/ Sat, 14 May 2022 03:57:00 +0000 https://tadasei.com/lmmo-presents-central-washington-mini-tour-with-pierre-bensusan-the-french-guitar-master/

From Wednesday, May 18 through Saturday, May 21, Learn From The Masters Outreach (LMMO), a musical philanthropy based in central Washington, is welcoming French acoustic guitar virtuoso Pierre Bensusan to the region through a series of concerts and performances. workshops. This performance segment caps Pierre’s long-awaited North American tour in 2022.

LMMO presents four concerts PLUS a guitar workshop. The LMMO has decided to present the first three concerts free of charge to the public:

“We are happy to offer this as a healing gift to the community after a long wait for live music performances during the COVID-19 pandemic, says Dr. Larry Birger, who founded the organization in 2018. .

The three FREE LMMO concerts are:

– Wed May 18, 7 p.m.
Moses Lake Civic Center Auditorium 401 S. Balsam St., Moses Lake, WA, 98837
Those planning to attend should add themselves to the guest list at:
https://www.tickettailor.com/events/learnfromthemastersmusicoutreach/685061

– Thursday, May 19, 7 p.m.

Morgan Performing Arts Center, 400 E. 1st Ave., Ellensburg, WA, 98926
Those planning to attend should add themselves to the guest list at:
https://www.tickettailor.com/events/learnfromthemastersmusicoutreach/685078

– Fri, May 20, 7 p.m.

Community Hall at The Hub, 277 Melody Ln, Wenatchee, WA, 98801
Those planning to attend should add themselves to the guest list at: https://www.tickettailor.com/events/learnfromthemastersmusicoutreach/679938

On Saturday, May 21, LMMO is also presenting two paid events:

– Pierre will be teaching a morning guitar workshop at Boogie Man Music, 101 East 2nd Ave., Ellensburg, WA, 98926 Registration at: https://www.tickettailor.com/events/learnfromthemastersmusicoutreach/685126

– Final concert of Pierre’s USA 2022 tour!
The Club Cave in the beautiful Cave B Estate Winery (near The Gorge Amphitheatre)
348 Silica Rd NW, Quincy, Wa, 98848 Tickets: $35 in advance / $40 at the door
Info / Order tickets online at: https://caveb.com/cave-b-estate-winery-events##events

LMMO, is dedicated to reaching people’s hearts and relationships with the healing power of music. They work closely with world-class artists to pursue this mission. Pierre, and especially his philosophy behind this new album, is so in line with LMMO that they have also become one of the main sponsors of the album: WATCH: LMMO presents Pierre Bensusan: The Azwan Washington Tour

The world-renowned fingerstyle guitarist has taken his unique sound to every corner of the world and is thrilled to resume his long-awaited tour across the United States, releasing his new album “Azwan” – about our unity and interconnectedness – finally performing these songs for live audiences in the midst of a unifying global crisis. Emotional, delicate, playful and moving, it garners rave reviews.

It’s as if the guitar had carte blanche to play on its own! Franco-Algerian acoustic guitar virtuoso, singer and composer Pierre Bensusan, nicknamed “Mr. DADGAD”, has taken his unique sound to the four corners of the globe. Winner of the Independent Music Awards for his triple live album “Encore”, voted best guitarist in world music by the readers’ poll of Guitar Player Magazine, and winner of the Rose d’Or at the Montreux Festival for his first album, Pierre is recognized as one of the greatest guitarists of the 21st century.

Born in Oran, France-Algeria, in 1957, when France was decolonizing its Empire, Pierre Bensusan’s family moved to Paris when he was 4 years old. He began formal piano studies at the age of 7 and at 11 taught himself the guitar. Influenced in his early days by the folk revival that was flourishing in Britain, France and North America, Bensusan first began to explore his own diverse musical heritage, then moved on to other horizons. He signed his first recording contract at the age of 17 and a year later his first album, “Près de Paris” won the Grand Prix du Disque on its debut at the Montreux Festival in Switzerland.

Described as one of the most unique and brilliant acoustic guitar veterans on the world music scene today, Pierre’s name has become synonymous with contemporary acoustic guitar genius, long before the term World Music came into its own. be invented. He literally created a playing style with the ability to make a single guitar sound like an entire band while taking the audience on a mesmerizing musical journey. And yet, Bensusan is more than any musician or music lover expects from a guitarist. He is both a bilingual and original composer and vocalist and improviser, with his own scat technique.

Immortalized by the tribute tune ‘Bensusan’ written by the late Michael Hedges, and referenced as an important source of inspiration for many other great musicians, Pierre Bensusan is a one-of-a-kind artist whose music transcends genres and genres. eras, with an uninhibited style sense of musical freedom and expression, a sense of something both playful and serious, out of this world but right here; right now. His “way” of playing defies classification – spanning world, classical, jazz, latin, traditional, folk, pop and more. None can be isolated as simply “World Music”, “Celtic”, “Arabic” or “French”; rather, they represent the authentic vocabulary of Pierre and the best part of our world in its current state, a world that is shared.

]]> What’s New in Livingston Parish – May 12 | Coming https://tadasei.com/whats-new-in-livingston-parish-may-12-coming/ Thu, 12 May 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://tadasei.com/whats-new-in-livingston-parish-may-12-coming/

Council on Aging Membership Campaign

The Livingston Council on Aging is hosting the 2022 Membership Drive through Friday, May 10, 2022. Anyone interested in becoming a member can register at the Council on Aging office at 949 Government Dr. Denham Springs, La. Or call our office at (225) 664-9343. Only registered members can vote at the annual meeting held in May. Those interested in membership must be at least 18 years of age and a resident of Livingston Parish.

Aging Advice Garage Sale

A garage sale will be held at the Livingston Council on Aging on May 13 and 14 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. both days. All donations and funds raised will go towards our “Fun Day” for seniors. The Livingston Council on Aging is located at 949 Government Drive in Denham Springs.

Unity awakening

Unity Revival invites people to “Come Celebrate Life” with services May 13-15. The programs will take place on May 13 at 7 p.m.; May 14 at 10:30 a.m. and 7 p.m.; and May 15 at 10:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. The programs will take place at Tickfaw State Park, located at 2722 Patterson Road in Springfield. Free entry.

Charity BBQ

The City of Walker Parks and Recreation is hosting a Taste of Walker Backyard Charity BBQ in conjunction with its monthly Farmer’s Market on Saturday, May 14 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The competition is open to all amateur cooks. Competitors can cook the meat of their choice. Donations will be made to the winner’s chosen charity. The BBQ Cook off and Farmer’s Market will be held at Sidney Hutchinson Park in the Challenger’s Field parking lot.

Explore Nature 2022

The Explore Nature event will take place on Saturday, May 14, 2021 at North Park, located at the corner of Lockhart and Eden Church Road in Denham Springs. This family educational event will run from 9 a.m. to noon and will be located in the middle of the park next to the walking path. Free entry. Explore Nature is an outdoor educational event sure to please everyone. Various nature and gardening groups will be on hand to provide information promoting the enjoyment of nature-centered activities. Kids activities and face painting will make this event fun for all ages. Visitors are invited to join avian biologist Katie Percy this morning for a birding walk around North Park. Learn the basics of birding or practice your skills in the field. Meet at 8:30 a.m. under the covered pavilion on the footpath. All ages are welcome. Upon arrival, children must stop at the Bibliobus to pick up a treasure hunt paper because those who visit all the kiosks will receive a special surprise. The following groups will also participate: Purple Martin Conservation Initiative, Louisiana Master Naturalists of Greater Baton Rouge, The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, LSU Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana, Capital Area Beekeepers Association, Wings of Hope Wildlife Sanctuary, Louisiana Amphibian and Reptile Enthusiasts ( LARE), Nature to Geaux, Livingston Parish Master Gardener, Livingston Parish Library, Live Oak High School Environmental Club and Katie Percy, Avian Biologist.

American Daylily Society

Region 13 of the American Daylily Society has chosen the Baton Rouge Daylily Society to host its 2022 Region 13 business meeting. As part of this event, five gardens will be open to the public. Although daylilies are grown in gardens, these gardens are far from being gardens just for daylilies. There will be plenty of companion plants, fountains, garden art and other interesting features that will interest even the most novice gardener. Please note that with the exception of the Baton Rouge Botanical Garden, these are private gardens and do not provide public restrooms or ADA access. The garden’s visiting hours are 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., Saturday, May 14, 2022. The garden’s address is: 901 West Colorado Street, Hammond, Louisiana, 70401; The Baton Rouge Botanical Garden, 7950 Independence Blvd., Baton Rouge, LA, 70806; 14510 Brenda Street, Gonzales, Louisiana, 70737; 5875 Forsythia Ave., Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 70808; and 1500 Ellis Drive, Hammond, Louisiana, 70401.

spring in the south

The Livingston Parish Arts Council will host a ‘Spring in the South’ art exhibit and Spring Marketplace through the end of May with a reception from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on May 21. Visit www.artslivingston.org for more information.

Free garage sale

A free community garage sale will be held Saturday, May 28 from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 13035 Arnold Road near the fire station and Avants Road. All items are free. Just share the Love of Jesus.

Remembrance Day Ceremony

The public is invited to attend a Memorial Day ceremony on Monday, May 30 at 10 a.m. at the Evergreen Memorial Park Mausoleum, located at 1710 S. Range Avenue in Denham Springs. The event is presented by VFW Post 7017.

Community music school

The Southeastern Louisiana University Community Music School hosts a series of summer programs for young musicians. The 2022 summer programs include a middle school orchestra camp, a chamber music workshop and seven weeks of individual lessons, said community music school principal Jivka Duke. Summer Camps provide a way for school-aged musicians to get a taste of Southeastern’s wonderful college music programs. Camps are filled with fun and friendships, while dramatically improving participants’ instrumental and musical skills. College Music Camp is scheduled for June 20-24, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Thursday and 1-5 p.m. Friday, with a concert at 5:30 p.m. Friday, June 24. Lunch is served Monday through Thursday. Tuition for the camp, scheduled at the Pottle Music Building on the Southeastern campus, is $250. Registration is open until the first day of camp; however, a $20 late fee will apply to entries mailed after May 20. Coordinated by Robert Schwartz, the camp is open to students in grades five through ninth during the 2021-22 school year, although high school students are also welcome. Camp activities include concert band, private lessons and masterclasses, jazz combos, improvisation lessons and theory lessons. The Chamber Music Workshop is scheduled for 9am-12pm, July 25-29, with a concert at 11:30am July 29. Tuition for the workshop is $170. Registration is open until the first day of the workshop; however, a $20 late fee will apply to entries mailed after June 20th. The CMS will also be offering private instrumental and vocal lessons from June 6 to July 21. The courses are scheduled according to the availability of the instructors and taking into account the family holidays of the students. . Prices for individual lessons vary depending on the qualifications of the instructor. For more information about any of these programs, go to www.southeastern.edu/cms or call 985-549-5502.

Introduction to stained glass

The Livingston Parish Arts Council will host an introductory stained glass class with artist instructor Kerry Curtin. The course is for people aged 16 and over. Students will learn the process of making a stained glass window using the lead technique. Practice using stained glass tools, cutting, fitting, soldering, puttying and cleaning/finishing glass. The first class will be June 23, 2022, 6-7pm (instructor’s talk reviewing equipment and supplies). Students will receive information on where to purchase glass and other supplies needed to start production at the next class meeting. The other classes will take place from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on July 7, 14, 21 and 28. The lesson will take place at South Live Oak Elementary School. There is a minimum of 8 students and a maximum of 10 students. The class fee is $125. The estimated cost of supplies is $75 (glass, lead, tools… to be purchased by the student). To register, visit www.artslivingston.org under Book A Class or call 225-664-1168.

VFW Travelers

The VFW Travelers is a travel group for people aged 50 and over. The group is now registering for their 2022 trips. The group will have four trips to choose from. A deposit of $75 per trip will allow you to reserve your place on the tourist bus. Covid injections are required. Seniors can choose one or more of our trips. Trips for 2022 are: Mount Rushmore June 24-July 4; Pigeon Forge, September 5-10; and Myrtle Beach, October 9-15. For more information, see www.grouptrips.com/vfwtravelers or call Vance and Debbie Sutton (225) 665-2930 or (225) 333-2790.

Summer Art Classes for Kids

Summer Art Classes for Kids under the direction of Kerry Curtin will take place June 27-30. Classes will be held at South Live Oak Elementary and are intended for students in grades 2-6. Session fees are $45 or $40 for CALP members. Students will focus on the elements of art and the principles of design as they create drawings and paintings using images of summer as a subject. Exercises in pencil, charcoal, pastel and watercolor will be carried out during the sessions. Students should bring regular #2 pencils and a drawing pad no larger than 16″ X 20″ (optional). People can make payment online at CALP or at the first class meeting. To register, visit www.artslivingston.org under Book A Class or call 225-664-1168.

Gray’s Creek Baptist Church Anniversary

On Saturday, June 26, 2022, Gray’s Creek Baptist Church will celebrate its 75th anniversary. Morning worship will begin at 10:00 a.m. with former staff member Reverend Tim Buford preaching and Greg Sullivan leading the music. Lunch will be served after worship. The birthday celebration service will be led by current pastor, Reverend David Brown and former pastor, Reverend Carl Sullivan, beginning at approximately 12:30 p.m. During the celebratory service, we will review the history of the church and recognize former staff and members. The Church History Committee will display historical memorabilia. Everyone is invited to come reconnect and visit “long lost” friends while celebrating the church’s milestone anniversary! Gray’s Creek Baptist Church is located at 21039 LA Hwy. 16, Denham Springs, LA.

VFW Travelers Travel to Alaska

VFW Travelers invite you to sign up for their next Alaska cruise. We will be sailing May 12-19, 2023 on the Celebrity Solstices. Price includes airfare, cruise, port fees, government fees, taxes, transfers, beverage package, gratuities and Wifi. The ocean view exterior is $2,599. The balcony cabin costs $3,159. COVID vaccines and passports are mandatory. Call Debbie Sutton for more information at (225) 665-2930.

(To place an article in the Coming Soon section, please email david@lpn1898.com.)

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Lowder, Kconnection Band will play this week https://tadasei.com/lowder-kconnection-band-will-play-this-week/ Tue, 10 May 2022 16:16:00 +0000 https://tadasei.com/lowder-kconnection-band-will-play-this-week/

The annual Tommy Jarrell Celebration – to commemorate the life and music of the influential local musician, is scheduled for February 24-24. 26 at the Historic Earle Theater in Mount Airy.

The celebration includes concerts, a competition for young people, workshops and a film screening. The popular festival has something for all lovers of early music. The annual event celebrates the music and teachings of Surry County music pioneer and icon Tommy Jarrell, who lived from March 1, 1901 to January 28, 1985.

Many activities are planned at the Old-Time Music Heritage Hall in the Historic Earle Theater at 142 North Main Street.

On Thursday 24 February there are free courses for young people. The flatfoot dance is at 4:30 p.m., violin lessons are at 5:30 p.m., followed by guitar, banjo and mandolin lessons at 6:15 p.m. Music lessons are taught by Jim Vipperman, recipient of the Brown-Hudson Folklore Award as a traditional musician and teacher. These lessons are sponsored in part by a TAPS grant from the Folklife Division of the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

The Southeast Sirens Tour will take to the stage at 7:30 p.m. Thursday. The tour is presented by the Surry Arts Council and Pine State Marketing and features Caitlin Krisko & The Broadcast and Abby Bryant & The Echoes. Tickets are $15.

Friday at 7 p.m., free screening of “You Gave Me A Song”, a film about Alice Gerrard. The film offers an intimate portrait of early music pioneer Alice Gerrard and her remarkable and unpredictable journey in the creation and preservation of traditional music. A Q&A with director Kenny Dalsheimer and Gerrard will follow the film.

A short performance by Gerrard accompanied by Tatiana Hargreaves and Reed Stutz will follow the Q&A. This film and event are made possible in part by the vital support of Presenting Sponsor, the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources through their “She Changed the World: NC Women Breaking Barriers” and “ Come Hear NC”.

In a career spanning over 50 years, Gerrard has left an indelible mark on the history of traditional music. Her groundbreaking collaboration with Appalachian singer Hazel Dickens in the 1960s and 1970s produced four classic albums (recently reissued by Rounder) and influenced many young female singers. His next four solo albums, including Bittersweet, produced by Laurie Lewis, and Follow the Music, produced by Mike Taylor of His Golden Messenger, showcased Gerrard’s many talents: his captivating and eclectic songwriting; his powerful, cutting voice and instrumental mastery of rhythm guitar, banjo and old-school fiddle. Gerrard’s 2015 album Follow the Music was nominated for a Grammy. His latest release, Sing Me Back Home: The DC Tapes 1965-1969 on Free Dirt Records, won critical acclaim for its intimate insight into unreleased Hazel and Alice practice tapes.

Gerrard has appeared on over 20 recordings, including projects with many mainstream musicians such as Tommy Jarrell, Enoch Rutherford, Otis Burris, Luther Davis and Matokie Slaughter; with Tom Sauber and Brad Leftwich as Tom, Brad & Alice, with the Harmony Sisters, the Herald Angels, Beverly Smith, and with Anna Roberts-Gevalt and Elizabeth LaPrelle.

Old-Time workshops take place on Saturdays from 1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the Earle. Workshops are $25 per person and participants can register online www.surryarts.org or rj@surryarts.org or call 336-786-7998. Through classes, presentations, workshops and performances, attendees will learn from some of the most esteemed and respected musicians in the field: Chester McMillian, Martha Spencer and Emily Spencer.

The workshops will take place in the Historic Earle Theater and will include fiddle, banjo, guitar, bass, singing and dancing – whatever participants want to learn. Martha Spencer is a singer-songwriter, mountain musician and dancer from the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia. She grew up in the Spencer musical family and learned to play multiple instruments (guitar, fiddle, banjo, bass, dulcimer, mandolin) and flatfoot/hooffoot at a young age. She has performed shows, festivals and led workshops across the US, Australia, UK and Europe. She just released a solo album and has been featured in articles such as Rolling Stone Country, No Depression, Wide Open Country, Cowboys & Indians Magazine, Americana Highways and PopMatters.

Emily Spencer is a certified PK-12 teacher and has taught fiddle, banjo, guitar, mandolin, dulcimer, and bass in schools and at Wilkes Community College and Wytheville Community College. Since childhood she has played music and started playing with the Whitetop Mountain Band in the 1970s with Thornton Spencer and continues with the band today.

Chester McMillian was born in Carroll County, Virginia to a musical family and community. He has been playing traditional Old-time Round Peak style music since he was a child. By the age of 11 or 12 he was living in Surry County and actively involved in the Round Peak music community. In 1962 Chester married into the Dix Freeman family and the two began playing a lot of music together. Chester played guitar with Tommy Jarrell for fifteen years, and he developed his guitar style specifically for playing with Tommy. He has also performed and recorded with Dix Freeman, Kirk Sutphin and Greg Hooven, with whom he founded the band Backstep.

On Saturday, the WPAQ Merry-Go-Round begins at 11 a.m. with workshop instructors and participants followed by bands including Grace ‘N Grass.

Lew Bode and Jim Vipperman will preside over the Tommy Jarrell Festival Youth Competition Saturday at 3 p.m. at the Andy Griffith Museum Theater under the Andy Griffith Museum. Categories include fiddle, clawhammer banjo, guitar, vocals, dance, and others (which includes all other instruments and bands), in two age levels: 5-12 and 13-18. Competitors will have three minutes to perform and may have an attendant, although no recorded saves are permitted. Competitors can register for the event, there is no entry fee and trophies are awarded after the competition.

The Whitetop Mountain Band will take the stage Saturday at 7 p.m. for the Tommy Jarrell Birthday Concert and Dance, hosted by Lew Bode. The Whitetop Mountain Band is a family band from the highest mountains in Virginia. Known for their high energy and charisma on stage, Whitetop Mountain Band is one of Appalachia’s most popular dance groups. They have performed at all manner of venues across the United States and abroad, including the Smithsonian Folklife Festival, National Folklife Festival, World Music Institute, Carter Family Festival, Dock Boggs Festival, Exposition universal, the Virginia Arts Festival, the Floyd Fest, the Ola Belle Reed Festival. , and Merlefest. Tickets are $10.

For more information or to purchase tickets, visit www.surryarts.org or call the Surry Arts Council at 336-786-7998. Tickets can also be purchased at the door before each show if available. Select Tommy Jarrell Festival events are supported in part by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

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🌱 Nashua Daily: sextortion case targeting teenagers; Derby night; After https://tadasei.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1-nashua-daily-sextortion-case-targeting-teenagers-derby-night-after/ Sat, 07 May 2022 07:07:26 +0000 https://tadasei.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1-nashua-daily-sextortion-case-targeting-teenagers-derby-night-after/

Happy Saturday, people of Nashua! It’s Tony Schinella. Here’s everything you need to know about what’s happening in Nashua today.


First, today’s weather forecast:

Partly sunny and windy. High: 52 Low: 44.

  • New England Crusaders, Inc.: New England Crusader Jamfest (8:00 a.m.)
  • Symphony NH: Symphonic rehearsals and concert (8:30 a.m.)
  • Pennichuck Corporation – Sole Shareholder’s 2022 Annual Meeting (9:00 a.m.)
  • Run2Rescue 5K (9:00 am)
  • Pennichuck Corporation – Annual Meeting of the Board of Directors (9:10 a.m.)
  • Arts & Crafts Show ~ Spring Showers Bring May Flowers (10:00 a.m.)
  • Sarah Evans: Spring Musical – Nashua School District (12:00 p.m.)
  • Nashua Chess Club – Nashua Public Library (12:00 PM)
  • Siopes and Holiday Live at Millyard Brewery (4:00 p.m.)
  • Mother’s Day Candle Bar + Flower Workshop (4:00 p.m.)
  • Symphony NH Presents: The Music of James Bond! (7:30 p.m.)
  • Symphony NH Presents: The Music of James Bond! (7:30 p.m.)

From my notebook:

  • Nextdoor neighbor, Webster Street: “Hi! – A friend of mine is looking for a replacement gate in good condition for a chain link fence. It can be used. Thanks.” (next door)

More from our sponsors – please support the local news!

  • OPEN STUDIOS, two days, 7+8 MAY Mother’s Day Weekend, Art Up Front Street, Exeter (7 May)
  • April showers bring May flowers Craft & Artisan Show (May 7)
  • Hire a pro to tackle mom’s to-do list (May 8)
  • Joseph and the Incredible Technicolor Dreamcoat (May 20)
  • Gary Negbaur: Jazz, Blues and American Roots (May 21)
  • Add your event

You are now in the loop and ready to start this Saturday! I’ll see you in your inbox tomorrow morning with another update.

Tony Schinella

About Me: Award-winning journalist and broadcaster for Patch.com in NH (off and on) since June 2011. Community coverage includes Concord, Hampton-North Hampton, Merrimack, Nashua, Portsmouth and Salem. Reachable at tony.schinella@patch.com. Career Highlights available on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/an…

Do you have a topical tip or a suggestion for an upcoming Nashua Daily? Contact me at tony.schinella@patch.com

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